Polish designers provide free of charge open source mechanical ventilator files for 3D printing. Just download, print and save lives!

A team of Polish engineers has developed and made available for free a ventilator project on the Internet that can be printed on a 3D printer.

    • Uses cheap and widely available components – it can save thousands of people’s lives in places where access to these devices is difficult
    • The first working version of the device is ready, works on the prototype II are almost complete
    • Support of specialists – physicians and engineers is needed. Those willing to help can apply at http://www.ventilaid.org/where the project has been made available.

The idea of ​​creating a respirator of last resort – i.e. a device that can be manufactured using a 3D printer and commonly available elements – came from the team of the Kraków company Urbicum, which specialises in 3D printing.

“The development of the VentilAid concept took our main designer Mateusz Janowski only two days” – says Szymon Chrupczalski from Urbicum. “VentilAid is free of the most serious disadvantage of similar projects – i.e. the need for hard-to-reach elements. We have created a project of a fully functional device, in which the total cost of components is about PLN 200”.

Low cost is a very important factor because – as the project authors predict – the demand for respirators will only increase in the coming months. The scenario in which increasing demand will cause a drastic increase in the prices of devices is also realistic, which may put patients in the poorer regions of the world in an even more difficult situation.

Full documentation of the first working VentilAid prototype is available until downloads from the project website http://www.ventilaid.org. It contains a set of information necessary to print and run a functioning ventilator. Work on the second version is almost complete, which will differ from the first by greater independence of power sources and the possibility of using even simpler components.

The creators of VentilAid call for help. “We warmly ask doctors, anaesthesiologists and hospital technicians with experience in working with ventilators, as well as engineers specialising in 3D printing and managers who can help us develop this project to come and join us” – says Szymon Chrupczalski. “We hope to find people of good will from around the world. Together, we can save the lives of many people”.


The project team


Szymon Chrupczalski – head and main organiser in Urbicum. Born in Krakow in 1981. An economist and lawyer by profession. Entrepreneur, traveler. For 15 years, he has been successfully improving economic education and free entrepreneurship in Poland.

Mateusz Janowski – creator of the project, head and chief designer at Urbicum. He was born in Krosno in 1986. Entrepreneur and designer. He has been building machines for 12 years, dismantling them for 30 years.

He specialises in designing CNC machines such as 3D printers and implementing them in production. He began constructing small wind farms, followed by motorcycles and electric bicycles, with his adventure with machine construction. The projects he implemented constantly encountered a major problem – prototyping was tedious, time consuming and expensive. After the discovery of 3D printing, he began to work on his own solutions, the first commercial orders and products, on which Urbicum was built, appeared.