The Warsaw Uprising – 77 anniversary of Powstanie Warszawskie

Date: 01-08-2021 Hour: 17:00

Event place: online

What was the Polish Uprising 1944 and why everyone should visit The Warsaw Rising Museum? The Museum Guide Aleksandra Duda reveals her great enthusiasm for the historic subject in an Interview with Iwona Golinska, Polish Sue President and Founder.

The Warsaw Uprising (Polish: Powstanie Warszawskie) was a major World War II operation, yet it is little-known in the United Kingdom.

The Warsaw Uprising began in the Summer of 1944 and was orchestrated by the Polish underground resistance and led by the Polish resistance Home Army (Polish: Armia Krajowa or AK). Its main goal was to liberate Warsaw from German occupation.
After days of hesitation, at 17:00 on 31 July, the Polish headquarters of AK scheduled “W-hour” (from the Polish wybuch, “explosion”), the moment of the start of the Uprising. The Uprising, therefore, began on the 1 August 1944 at 17.00.
The uprising was timed to coincide with the retreat of the German forces from Poland ahead of the Soviet advance. While approaching the eastern suburbs of the city, the Red Army temporarily halted combat operations, enabling the Germans to regroup and defeat the Polish resistance and to destroy the city in retaliation. The Uprising was the single largest military effort taken by any European resistance movement during World War II.

Although the exact number of casualties is unknown, it is estimated that about 16,000 members of the Polish resistance were killed and about 6,000 gravely wounded. In addition, between 150,000 and 200,000 Polish civilians died, mostly from mass executions. German casualties totalled over 2,000 to 17,000 soldiers killed and missing. During the urban combat, approximately 25% of Warsaw’s buildings were destroyed. Following the surrender of Polish forces, German troops systematically levelled another 35% of the city block by block.

Until the 1990s, historical analysis of the events remained superficial because of official censorship and lack of academic interest. Research into the Warsaw Uprising was boosted by the revolutions of 1989, due to the abolition of censorship and increased access to state archives. As of 2004, however, access to some material in British, Polish and ex-Soviet archives was still restricted. Further complicating the matter is the British claim that the records of the Polish government-in-exile were destroyed, and material not transferred to British authorities after the war was burnt by the Poles in London in July 1945.
In Poland, 1 August is now a highly celebrated anniversary.

The Warsaw Uprising Museum (named Warsaw Rising Museum, in Polish: Muzeum Powstania Warszawskiego) is in the Wola -a district of Warsaw. It is fully dedicated to the Warsaw Uprising of 1944. The Museum which website is https://www.1944.pl/en recently opened new channels of communications on social media in the English language. These channels are aimed at popularizing knowledge about the Warsaw Uprising and Warsaw itself – a city of tragic wartime history. The channels should be now easily obtainable to the Polish community abroad as well as the whole World.

I had the pleasure to talk to the Guide and Expert of the Museum, Ms Alexandra Duda. In my short interview with Aleksandra, I was trying to understand more about the Warsaw Rising and its significance today. I was also enquiring about the Museum’s goals and plans.
And here it is.

WHERE: online

WHEN: SUNDAY, 1 AUGUST 2021 FROM 17:00 UTC+01-18:00 UTC+01

FACEBOOK event: here

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